Activities at Fibreshed Day – April 8, 2018

The Slow Fashion movement at the third annual Fibreshed Day … a contest to find Fibreshed garments – which fibres are they made from, what dyes have been used for colour, and who has created the final garment? The prize to the winner … a toque made with local fibre dyed by Heather, and spun & knit by Dorothy. Lots of fun.

Shirley was cozily wrapped in a shawl that had been dyed with mushrooms, spun, and woven by Deanna. Merrily was decked out head to toe in local, local, local!!!

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Lisa, a happy gardener with happy Japanese Indigo plants and dyers garden starter kits, was wearing an indigo dyed headband made by Merrily who used local sheep fibre.

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Andrew was becoming one with the electric carder in the cold as his antique spinning wheel awaited a turn. Blended batts of local fleece and colours were ready to be felted around small bars of locally made soap. Andrew was keeping his head warm with a knit toque made totally from local sheep fibre – spun, and dyed with indigo & local mushrooms by Merrily.

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Intrigued participants watched and interacted with various activities and demonstrators.

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Shepherdess Ann, from La Morna farm, wore a shoulder cowl made from various local sheep and llama fibres – some natural, others dyed with Indigo – processed, spun, and knit by Lynda. Lori, of Lorelee Lane farm, sported a shawl made from Ann’s baby doll sheep, “Sweetie Pie” – washed and combed by Joan Fletcher, spun by Merrily, and designed & knit by Verna.

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Ann Harmer displayed her Fibreshed shawl dyed with recipes from her mushroom dyeing book, “Magic in the Dyepot”. The collar around her neck was made from hair of her dog, Silas. Jeannie, in the background, was stirring a dyepot of local plants while sporting a jaunty hat made from local sheep fibre of natural shades – processed and knit by Janice.

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Lots of conversation … people want to know what we do, what we are wearing, and how can they get started?

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The magnificent community blanket was on display. The same blanket that was featured at last year’s Fibreshed Day for a waulking ceremony. The Sunshine Coast Spinners and Weavers Guild and the Fibreshed group had gathered local fleece, washed, picked, carded, spun and woven it as a group project. It became a teddy bear’s picnic blanket, along with knit bears, boats, bunnies, sheep, a mouse, and some ants – all part of the display booth at the ANWG 2017 Conference in Victoria, BC.

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Our Sunshine Coast Fibreshed display featured local fibre dyed with local colour (especially bright pokeberry pinks & indigo blues), and a woven reed basket by Ursula with Yvonne’s studio as a background.

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Fibre friend Troch along with Lynn viewed the sheep shearing. Lynn modeled a natural shawl made by Deanna who used local fibre from a sheep named “Olivia”.

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Locally grown flax waved from the pole as Lynn offered her stash for touch & tell!

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Mark of the Hand Studio, at FibreWorks, offered local fibre … and cookies.

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Yvonne was wearing a shawl made from local fibres that she dyed with walnuts, spun and knit. Marilyn displayed her creative needlework, all the way down to her shoes.

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Photos and story submitted by Lynda Daniells

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