Category Archives: Dyeing

Activities at Fibreshed Day – April 8, 2018

The Slow Fashion movement at the third annual Fibreshed Day … a contest to find Fibreshed garments – which fibres are they made from, what dyes have been used for colour, and who has created the final garment? The prize to the winner … a toque made with local fibre dyed by Heather, and spun & knit by Dorothy. Lots of fun.

Shirley was cozily wrapped in a shawl that had been dyed with mushrooms, spun, and woven by Deanna. Merrily was decked out head to toe in local, local, local!!!

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Lisa, a happy gardener with happy Japanese Indigo plants and dyers garden starter kits, was wearing an indigo dyed headband made by Merrily who used local sheep fibre.

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Andrew was becoming one with the electric carder in the cold as his antique spinning wheel awaited a turn. Blended batts of local fleece and colours were ready to be felted around small bars of locally made soap. Andrew was keeping his head warm with a knit toque made totally from local sheep fibre – spun, and dyed with indigo & local mushrooms by Merrily.

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Intrigued participants watched and interacted with various activities and demonstrators.

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Shepherdess Ann, from La Morna farm, wore a shoulder cowl made from various local sheep and llama fibres – some natural, others dyed with Indigo – processed, spun, and knit by Lynda. Lori, of Lorelee Lane farm, sported a shawl made from Ann’s baby doll sheep, “Sweetie Pie” – washed and combed by Joan Fletcher, spun by Merrily, and designed & knit by Verna.

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Ann Harmer displayed her Fibreshed shawl dyed with recipes from her mushroom dyeing book, “Magic in the Dyepot”. The collar around her neck was made from hair of her dog, Silas. Jeannie, in the background, was stirring a dyepot of local plants while sporting a jaunty hat made from local sheep fibre of natural shades – processed and knit by Janice.

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Lots of conversation … people want to know what we do, what we are wearing, and how can they get started?

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The magnificent community blanket was on display. The same blanket that was featured at last year’s Fibreshed Day for a waulking ceremony. The Sunshine Coast Spinners and Weavers Guild and the Fibreshed group had gathered local fleece, washed, picked, carded, spun and woven it as a group project. It became a teddy bear’s picnic blanket, along with knit bears, boats, bunnies, sheep, a mouse, and some ants – all part of the display booth at the ANWG 2017 Conference in Victoria, BC.

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Our Sunshine Coast Fibreshed display featured local fibre dyed with local colour (especially bright pokeberry pinks & indigo blues), and a woven reed basket by Ursula with Yvonne’s studio as a background.

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Fibre friend Troch along with Lynn viewed the sheep shearing. Lynn modeled a natural shawl made by Deanna who used local fibre from a sheep named “Olivia”.

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Locally grown flax waved from the pole as Lynn offered her stash for touch & tell!

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Mark of the Hand Studio, at FibreWorks, offered local fibre … and cookies.

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Yvonne was wearing a shawl made from local fibres that she dyed with walnuts, spun and knit. Marilyn displayed her creative needlework, all the way down to her shoes.

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Photos and story submitted by Lynda Daniells

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Fun Fibreshed Day at the Yurts – April 8, 2018

The third annual Sunshine Coast Fibreshed Day, “Barn to Yarn”, held at Fibreworks Studio & Gallery in Madeira Park, BC had a grounded feeling for participants. They saw, from start to finish … 🐑 fleece being washed, picked, carded, spun into yarn or felted, dyed, and then created by knitting into garments … where the clothes we wear truly come from!

Tarps were up, the rain held off, and a fun time was enjoyed by all at Fibreshed Day 2018

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There were spinners, carders, felters, weavers, knitters, and dyers. All were wearing sheep badges asking participants to list the local fibre, the local dye, and the artisan who created the garment they were modeling. This slow fashion contest, ending with a draw and prize, engaged folk attending the annual Fibreshed Day to discover answers … to the slow fashion movement.

Mojo and Rodney, sheep from Wendy’s farm in Wilson Creek, arrived for shearing and pedis. Soon local shearer Johanna was in full swing demonstrating her craft of sheep shearing.

Local Fibreshed fibre producers, Lori of Lorelee Lane Farm in Roberts Creek and Ann of Lamorna Farm also in Roberts Creek, displayed their alpaca, llama, and sheep fleeces.

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There were local nibblies to graze on with Mary & Susan’s big smiles inviting all to enjoy.

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The Slow Fashion contest prize … a toque of local wool, dyed with local plants by Heather, and spun & knit by Dorothy … was won by a very happy Catherine Nicholls.

A big thank you to all the participants from Lynda & Merrily.

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Photos and story submitted by Lynda Daniells

Photos of Catherine Nicholls submitted by Merrily Corder

Fibreshed at the Annual Fibres Plus Sale 2017 – November 24th & 25th

Halls are decked with decorations resembling Christmas and after a long day of set-up, the Fibreshed team is ready for the public to peruse its display.

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Local fibre is carded and hand-dyed with pokeberry, Japanese indigo, and other local plants giving a lovely variety of colours including yellows, greens, blues, brilliant pinks, and luscious burgundy shades to the rovings.

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The rovings are spun into yarn which is then processed into a variety of saleable products by weaving, knitting, and or felting. All items are juried and only items made with local fibre, and hand-dyed with dyes made from local plants are qualified to receive certified Fibreshed tags.

It has been a successful year and even the ANWG bears are happy to be on display for sale.

 

Fibreshed goes to Fibre Camp 2017

The Sunshine Coast Spinners and Weavers Guild’s Fibre Camp 2017 was held at Camp Sunrise on the Sunshine Coast of BC from Sept 7th to Sept 9th. Fifty fibre enthusiasts gathered to attend workshops, played with their fibre, shopped at vendor stalls, talked, ate and shared their stories.

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The Sunshine Coast Fibreshed display featured local fleece dyed with local pokeberries.

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The pokeberry was dyed using the solar method…aka…Sun Kissing.

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Jars of solar dyed marigolds and onion skins produce bright golds and soft yellows. When overdyed with Japanese Indigo, various shades of green are the result.

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On display at Fibre Camp was our Teddy Bears Picnic Blanket along with many items hand made by local artisans from local fleece, dyed with local plants…all invited to the picnic!

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This Community Blanket Project was a joint effort by the Sunshine Coast Fibreshed and the Sunshine Coast Spinners and Weavers Guild. We gathered fibre from the Sunshine Coast, washed, picked, carded, spun, wove and waulked a brilliant picnic blanket for our guild booth display at ANWG this past July in Victoria, B.C.

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After spending the day at Camp spinning, spindling, weaving, knitting we had an impromptu Tai Chi exercise session to limber up. Fun and relaxing.

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One of the Camp workshops by author of Magic in the Dyepot, Ann Harmer, featured dyeing with local mushrooms.

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The weekend offered Fibreshed ongoing opportunities to connect, share, learn and have fun with fibre folk from as far away as New York, across to Washington along the Pacific Coast, and within BC to Vancouver Island. Stay tuned for next year’s Fibre Camp on the Sunshine Coast, BC.

Submitted by Lynda Daniells,
Photos by Lynda and Merrily

International Earth Day 2017

April 21, 2017, international Earth Day was celebrated in Roberts Creek, BC by our local Sunshine Coast Fibreshed. The day started out dry with sunshine, always windy at the pier. We set up our colourful Fibreshed display with locally dyed rovings, plants for a Dyers garden and local sheep fleece for garden mulch….
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We featured felting as a creative use of fleece. Ursula Bentz, master felter displayed her gorgeous felted pieces and then assisted folk to make something felted.
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Young folk were engaged with Ursula, the fleece, the soap, creating.
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This young fellow was very pleased with his felted flower and both children took home felting kits sold for $5.00.
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Another young Creeker put finishing touches on this felted mouse.
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Many children engaged in felting and let their creative spirit fly.
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Everyone got in the spirit of the day….kids of all ages.
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Fibreshed was displaying the dyeing  colours we can obtain by growing plants locally such as Pokeberry, Japanese Indigo, Marigolds, Onion Skins, also by gathering local mushrooms on the Coast. Merrily selling Dyers garden starters.
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It was a great day in the Creek until wind and rain started to ruin our display. We packed up early and have everything drying by the home fire now.
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Photos by Lynda Daniells & Merrily Corder,
Submitted by Lynda

Second Annual Fibreshed Day – Part 1

From Shepherdess to Knitted Dress

The Second Annual Sunshine Coast Fibreshed Day was held April 9, 2017 at Fibreworks Studio and Gallery, Madeira Park, BC. The focus was on our local Shepherds & Shepherdesses to show off fibre from their sheep and the steps of shearing through to finished product.

FS YR2_1 Wendy Gilbertson_Mojo
Wendy Gilbertson on her Wilson Creek farm with “Mojo”, a Blue Faced Leister breed.

FS YR2_2 Johanna Walker shearing Mojo
Wendy brought Mojo, and Rodney, a Romney breed to the event for shearing. Johanna Walker is shearing Mojo while Rodney, pictured here, waits his turn. Folks were very keen to watch.

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Mojo’s fleece laid out by Johanna, ready for skirting. The not so nice bits can be used in the garden for mulch.

FS YR2_4 George Smith with Wendy
George Smith is talking with Wendy after Rodney and Mojo have had their haircuts.

FS YR2_5 Sheep Dog Paige on guard.
Paige the sheep herding dog guards Rodney and Mojo along with Reg.

FS YR2_6 Joan Reeves and Roberta Symons
Anna joined us for the day and took this Suffolk fleece to process for Joan Reeves and Roberta Symons, both spinners and knitters. In back is Lynne Sturm showing many other uses for fleece.

FS YR2_7 Picking Fleece Circle
If one doesn’t send raw fleece to a mill for processing then one begins washing, drying and picking by hand as portrayed in this picking circle. Picking removes bits of vegetable matter and opens up the locks to prepare for the next step. It’s a nice time to chat with friends or meet new ones.

FS YR2_7 Dorothy carding
Next step is to card the fleece using hand carders or a drum carder. Dorothy Thom is using an electric carder to make a batt for spinning or felting.

FS YR2_8 Pokeburry Pink Dying Kits
Dying with local mushrooms and plants can add brilliant colour such as the new hot colour of the season, Pokeberry Pink. Fibreshed was selling Dyers garden starter kits.

FS YR2_9 Rovings dyed locally and naturally
All these rovings come from local fibre which have been dyed by local artisans using local mushrooms and plants.

Dianne Lim is felting a sushi roll while Jean Pataky is felting a bird’s nest. What an animated conversation they seem to be having.

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Two teddy bears wearing their special KNITTED DRESSES; finished product by local artisan Muriel Prior using local fibre and natural dyes.

FS YR2_13 Doreen weaving
Doreen MacLauchlan is weaving a scarf with her homespun, hand processed yarn. Helene Nissle is talking about characteristics of various sheep breeds.

FS YR2_14 Yarn Display
Deanna Pilling displayed her hand spun, home processed Llama.  On the right is her Icelandic yarn and shawl made with ‘Katy’.

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Local Shepherdess Ann Fransblow of Roberts Creek, BC showing sheep characteristics and uses at the display table.

FS YR2_16 RefreshmentsFS YR2_17 Donated Quail Eggs

Local refreshments included homemade pickles, toasted kale chips, baked salmon, pesto cream cheese spread, local artisan breads, fresh local radishes and more…

Pat and Diane Walker of Christmas Road Farm donated quail eggs.

Grown and Sewn Close to Home

April 10th was a beautiful sunny day for the Sunshine Coast Fibreshed’s “Grown and Sewn Close to Home” event at the FibreWorks Studio & Gallery in Madeira Park.  Fibre farmers and processors, artists, teachers and fibre art enthusiasts gathered together to meet, network and learn from each other.

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There were displays of local fibres and beautifully coloured wool dyed with plants and mushrooms from the Sunshine Coast.

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Participants enjoyed Jean Pataky’s display with pictures, descriptions and wool samples from different breeds of sheep.

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When Helene Nissle lived in Ontario her Guild did a study of the fleece of different sheep in their area.  Members visited local sheep farmers and collected samples of fleece which were divided up among members who processed and studied the wool from each breed.  Helene then wove the yarn into two weavings.

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It was interesting to look at the weavings and see the difference between washed and unwashed wool in the final product and the appearance of various combinations of fibres in the warp and weft.

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Members of the Sunshine Coast Spinners and Weavers Guild gave ongoing demonstrations of carding,

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knitting

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and spinning.

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Participants could admire Marie-Claire DeClerck’s beautiful handwoven Fibreshed scarves and shawls while watching her weave with her own handspun yarn.

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Doreen MacLauchlan worked on weaving her handspun local alpaca and Shetland wool into a scarf, patterning it in the Fibonacci sequence.

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Participants enjoyed meeting rug hookers Mudito Drope and Lynne Hunt.  Lynne started the group Hooked on the Coast in 2013.  Here they show off Lynne’s wall hanging of Icelandic sheep, inspired by her visit to Iceland.

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Ron McInnis of Imaginary Image was busy recording the Fibreshed’s first big event (see the April 12 blog to watch his beautiful video).  Here he’s filming Andrew who’s demonstrating carding and spinning beautifully soft local llama fibre.

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Two visiting sheep, Razz and George, were a great attraction.  They’re part of Kate Skinner’s flock of 10 sheep that she uses for training sheep dogs.  Kate was delighted to meet fibre users to learn what they’re looking for in a fleece and how she might improve her own fleece.  She was interested to see the whole process of wool preparation from the sheep through carding, spinning, dyeing and making a final garment.

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We were delighted that Anna Runnings of Qualicum Bay Fibre Works could come to the Coast for the event.  The mill plays an important role in the Fibreshed.  Anna processes all fibres and does washing, picking, carding into rovings or batts, pindrafting and spinning.

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Local sheep owner Wendy Gilbertson shows off some of her Shetland wool that was washed and carded at Qualicum Bay Fibre Works.

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Catherine Simpson of Kensington Prairie Farm raises suri and huacaya alpacas.  She brought her beautifully soft yarn, rovings and fleece.

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The Sunshine Coast Spinners and Weavers Guild and the Fibreshed are planning a display for the 2017 ANWG (Association of Northwest Weavers’ Guilds) Conference in Victoria, British Columbia.  The project will be a blanket made with local fibre, local dyes, washed, carded, spun, dyed and woven by local artisans.  Deanna Pilling wove a beautiful shawl out of her handspun local fibre as a trial run and as a display at our event.

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In the summer of 2013 some members of the Sunshine Coast Spinners and Weavers Guild planted and dyed with Japanese Indigo for the first time (see October 5, 2013 blog).  Since then, Japanese Indigo has been an important part of our Fibreshed dyeing.  To further encourage growing and dyeing with this wonderful dye plant we gave out free seedlings and instruction sheets.

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Everyone enjoyed the delicious nibbles and refreshments made by local cooks from local ingredients – Fibreshed flatbread, rhubarb punch, kale chips, borlotti bean dip, homemade goat cheese, pesto, salmon, muffins and devilled eggs.  Fibreshed team members Deanna Pilling, Lynda Daniells and Merrily Corder show off Deanna’s delicious Fibreshed flatbread.

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As part of the networking that took place, Noelline Bellemare of the Ecole du Pacifique met sheep and llama owners and Fibreshed team members who were happy to help with a project of taking her Kindergarten and Grade 1 classes to a farm to meet animals and  follow up with demonstrations of carding and spinning.  It’s so important for young people to experience where their clothes come from and how they are made.

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Participants enjoyed and learned from the displays.

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There was lots of communication and sharing among artisans, fibre producers and school teachers.

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Our Fibreshed team members were kept busy answering peoples’ many questions.

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Kate Skinner summed up the event, “It was a fun, informative day with a group of friendly, welcoming people.  I learned a huge amount.” It was a wonderful day with participants feeling an increased enthusiasm and commitment to make responsible clothing choices that support local sustainability and protect the environment.

Heather Apple